Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Updated at 4:40 p.m. ET.

The chief of the St. Louis County Police says a black teenager fatally shot by officers Saturday was killed during an altercation with authorities.

But as Chief Jon Belmar was speaking at a news conference Sunday morning, a few hundred angry protesters carrying signs converged on the police station taunting police with chants of "Don't shoot me," according to The Associated Press.

The government in the West African nation of Guinea is denying reports that it has sealed its borders with neighboring Liberia and Sierra Leone in response to the Ebola outbreak.

Guinea's health minister said Saturday that it had closed its borders with the two countries to prevent infected people from entering. State television in Guinea later said, however, that it had only instituted special health measures at border posts, according to the BBC.

Updated at 1:40 p.m. ET.

Israeli officials have confirmed a new three-day cease-fire with Hamas in the Gaza Strip, a move that clears the way for a resumption on talks to end the weekslong conflict.

Update at 11:50 a.m. ET.

A Baghdad government minister says at least 500 members of Iraq's minority Yazidis have been killed by Islamic militants.

Updated at 3:50 p.m. ET.

Amid reports that Ukraine army forces are closing in on rebel-held Donetsk, the leader of the separatist insurgents says his fighters would accept a cease-fire to avoid a looming humanitarian crisis.

The Associated Press says:

"There was no immediate government response to the statement Saturday from Aleksandr Zakharchenko, the so-called prime minister of the Donetsk separatists.

Updated at 12:25 p.m. ET.

President Obama says that the U.S. will continue to provide Iraq with humanitarian and military assistance, but he ruled out ground troops and reiterated administration calls for Iraq to form a "legitimate" government in order to face the threat from Islamic militants.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has released a video of its test of a new inflatable braking system designed to land heavy payloads on Mars.

Updated at 4:55 p.m. ET.

The end of the latest cease-fire in the Gaza Strip has been marked by intense Israeli airstrikes against Hamas targets.

The U.S. and United Nations have condemned the resumption of hostilities that comes at the end of a three-day truce on Friday.

Updated at 11:45 a.m. ET.

U.S. forces conducted additional humanitarian airdrops to northern Iraq today to aid members of the Yazidi religious minority trapped by Islamic militants battling Iraqi troops.

President Obama today said the U.S. commitment would not involve ground troops and said that it would likely take "some months" to sort out the country's humanitarian and military crises.

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